Wednesday, 2 June 2010

New Article Posted

My article "Ten Science Fiction Books to Give Your Father-in-Law" has been posted on sf website New Myths as part of their issue 11. Just click on the link below if you want to give it a read.

http://www.newmyths.com/

2 comments:

Dale T. Phillips said...

Thank you! I just read your article, and the caption sparked a number of titles in my mind. To my delight, they were ones you recommended. Excellent taste! ;-)

Canticle and Bring the Jubilee being perfect examples- and not as well known these days, but timeless classics. Flowers- in my interview for New Myths last issue, I mentioned this as my favorite story! (yes, book counts)
I was so impressed, I signed on as a follower of your blog.
For your next set, may I suggest the obvious Ender's Game, and the excellent Islands in the Sea of Time by S. M. Stirling (start of a series).
Keep up the good work...

I.E. Lester said...

Thanks for the comments. I've been reading sf for over thirty years now and have read a great number of the golden age stuff. Bring the Jubilee is one of my favourite books.

This list was very much singular in its focus - and actually true. Hence the lack of some of the absolute greats of the period. If I was compiling a list of favourite sf of the period I would be including titles like Odd John and, purely because it was one of the first sf books I read, Lester del Rey's Police Your Planet.

As for more modern books I have to admit Ender's Game is one of the best books I've ever read but it really isn't a book I would have handed over to my wife's father.

It is however the book I recommend more often than any other to anyone wanting to find out what writeen sf is all about. I think I must have converted a dozen people to sf readers with that one book and the following reasoning.

You become hooked on reading when you find that single book the inspires you so much you want to spend the rest of your life trying to find another such novel.

I also use Mike Resnick's Santiago, Robert Charles Wilson's The Chronoliths (which is unfortunately hard to get hold of) and Nancy Kress's Beggars in Spain.

It just depends upon the person in front of me as to which I suggest they start with.

I think I might just have to write another article based on this idea - novels to use as bait to hook non-sf folk and reel them into the fold.

You might just have got me thinking.

Thanks again